Posts

Common Artwork Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

Common Artwork Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

At Southside Print we can either accept artwork files from customers, or produce artwork for them. Obviously, clients can save some money if they choose the former option and do their own design and artwork. However, if they’re not used to generating their own professional-grade artwork, common mistakes are easy to miss. These could lead to digital artwork files not working at all, unexpected printing results or, even worse, paid-for printing being totally unusable. For these reasons, we thought we’d highlight the most common artwork mistakes that we see, in the hope that they can be avoided by customers who supply their own artwork files to us.

1: Incorrect Colour Mode

Colour photos and graphics should be saved in CMYK mode not RGB.Most mobile phones and digital cameras save images in RGB mode. This mode is meant for screen viewing rather than commercial printing. If digital artwork is supplied with images in RGB mode, there’s a significant chance that they will not look as expected – potentially terrible – on the final printed results.

Solution: Before putting full colour images into artwork files, they should first be opened in an application like Photoshop and re-saved in CMYK mode. For the same reason, the final artwork file (usually saved as a print-ready PDF) should also be saved in CMYK mode when printing full colour images.

2: Inadequate Image Resolution

Have you ever looked at something printed, perhaps in a brochure, and spotted one or more images that look a bit fuzzy or, worse still, pixelated? Both are almost certain to be due to the images having inadequate resolution within the artwork files supplied. With resolution too low, images can appear ‘soft’ and lacking detail at best, or broken up into visible squares (the pixels) at worst.

Solution: Ensure that photographic images are at least 300 dots per inch (‘dpi’, also known as ‘pixels per inch’ or ‘ppi’) at the size they are going to be shown in the final printing. This can also be checked in professional image editing applications like Photoshop. It’s important to ensure that the final digital artwork file (again, usually provided as a print-ready PDF) is also saved with images set to 300dpi or, for particularly fine screen rulings, 350dpi minimum. If they’re well above that resolution, most applications can save the print-ready PDF in such a way that images with resolutions above, say, 450dpi are ‘downsampled’ to 300 or 350dpi. If downsampling is used, the Image Quality setting should be set to Maximum.

Related note: ‘Line artwork’ type images should either be saved as vectors (e.g. Illustrator ‘EPS’ format) or, if they’re ‘rasterised’ (pixel-based) images, save them at a minimum of 1200dpi to avoid jagged edges showing on areas like curves.

3: Using the Wrong Application for Professional Artwork

Applications like Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and even Corel Draw are fine for office use and for outputting to standard desktop printers. However, they’re not really seen as professional applications for use within the commercial printing industry. Attempting to use them as such may well simply not work, give unprofessional, substandard results, cause glitches in the case of Corel Draw, or require your commercial printer to re-make your artwork again from scratch (at significant cost in all likelihood).

Solution: Don’t attempt to use desktop applications like Word and PowerPoint nor, in our view, Corel Draw for use with high-end commercial printing. Instead, you should be using a professionally-recognised design and artwork application like Adobe InDesign. It is the de-facto design, page make-up and artwork application used in the design and print industry, having pretty much replaced older applications like Quark Express and PageMaker. It is usually used in tandem with images and graphics brought in from Adobe Photoshop and/or Adobe Illustrator, which are also both the de-facto professional applications for each of their respective fields.

4: Missing Out Bleed

Add 3mm bleed to elements extending to the paper's edgeIf your design and artwork has colours or images going right to the edge of the printed item, you shouldn’t just stop your artwork there because guillotining of the final printing is not usually accurate to tenths of a millimetre. Therefore, you could end up with white edges showing rather than your background colour or image going right up to and off the edge of the cut sheet.

Solution: Remember to add an extra 3mm of ‘bleed’ (an area that prints further than the edge of the sheet) to all artwork elements that you want to print to the edge. That way, if guillotining is not quite accurate, your colour or image will still print to the edge because you built in a 3mm margin of possible error.

5: Sitting Artwork in the Middle of a Larger Sheet

When producing finished artwork for, say, a business card, it might be tempting to produce it in the middle of an A4 sheet, because that’s the size of paper you might usually deal with on your computer. However, saving smaller artworks on larger paper sizes within digital artwork can end up costing you money and causing problems at printing stage. That’s because it’s terribly difficult, if not impossible, to get rid of the surrounding margin. That’s important when we want to use several duplicates of the business card on the uncut printing sheets, so as to get economies of scale and reduce paper/card waste.

Solution: Within your design and artwork application, ensure that your document size is set to the correct, final size that you want your printed piece to be, and no larger (apart from the additional 3mm of bleed if needed — see above). Also discuss whether you need to add ‘trim marks’ with your commercial printer as that requirement can vary from printer to printer.

6: Supplying Readers’ Spreads instead of Printers’ Spreads

Let’s take the example of an 8-page brochure for illustrative purposes. In that example, although page 2 will be next to page 3 from a reader’s point of view on the final brochure, that’s not how they’re actually printed. If you supply your artwork with double-page spreads set up in that way, pages will end up on the wrong order in the final printing.

Solution: In the 8-page brochure example, you have two choices. The first is to supply individual pages rather than spreads and then allow your printer to do what’s called ‘imposing’ them into the correct multi-page spreads from which to print. That’s the safest option if you’re not a professional designer or ‘finished artist’. For professionals, though, you can supply properly imposed ‘printer’s spreads’, for example with the front cover on the right next to the back cover on the left, page 2 printed opposite page 7, page 3 alongside page 5 and so on. Either way, once printed, trimmed and folded, the pages will end up in the correct order, so long as the imposing is done thoughtfully.

7: Using the Space Bar for Tabulated or Indented Content

If you hit the space bar multiple times to try to align indented content or columns of text or numbers, you will almost certainly end up with columns that don’t quite line up vertically in a straight line. That’s because most commercially printed fonts don’t use a ‘fixed width’ measurement for every character. So, one line of 30 characters (including spaces) will almost certainly end up a different length to another line of 30 different characters. Hence, columns will look misaligned and unprofessional.

Solution: Professional designers use properly set-up tabs to align their tabulated content, not the space bar. This ensures that tabulated content and indents line up perfectly. And what’s more, it’s easier than you think once you’ve tried it a few times — and saves time.

8: Ad-hoc Text Styles

Changing font styles, colours, sizes and weights on an ad-hoc basis as you work through your text content is more likely to end up with styling errors and inconsistencies. This can make a printed piece look amateurish.

Solution: Use your professional design and artwork package’s character and paragraph style palettes properly, i.e. pre-set a range of styles that you are likely to use and then apply one style to each title, sub-title, paragraph etc. as you work through your document. It’ll save you time and mean that styling is totally consistent throughout your final printed piece. What’s more, if you decide one particular type of content needs to be altered throughout the entire document, all you need to do is to change that particular pre-set style once in the palette — and the whole document will update itself.

9: Using Clip-Art

Clip-art from desktop applications is all very well for internally-produced ‘office’ type documents that are to be printed on desk-top printers. However, they often lead to unexpected printing results on commercial printers. That’s because clip-art formats like Windows Meta Files are not designed for such commercial use; they often cause glitches in the printing or crashes in commercial printing PostScript software. In essence, clip-art is simply not fit for commercial printing purposes.

Solution: There are 3 possible solutions. Firstly, you could avoid clip-art unless it’s professionally produced specifically for high-end commercial PostScript printing and comes in a file format like .ai or .eps (and is in CMYK mode). Secondly, you could consider generating the designed graphic yourself using a professional programme like Adobe Illustrator. Then export it to your InDesign document layout as an EPS file. Lastly, you could try to ‘rasterise’ any suitable image (for example, by opening it, or a PDF of it, in Photoshop) so that it essentially ends up as the equivalent of a photo, i.e. made up of pixels instead of clip-art vectors. N.B. don’t forget to check it’s in CMYK mode and at least 300dpi if going for a rasterised (non-vector) route.

10: Not Proof-Reading Thoroughly

Once printed, it’s too late to correct any errors that were missed in your design and artwork. And you’ll still have to pay for the original printing and any reprint needed.

Solution:It goes almost without saying that you should check, double-check and triple-check every job before sending it to your commercial printer. Maybe even get another person to check again for you. Spell checking and proof-reading are all part of the checking process, as are technical checks to ensure that images are in the correct mode, that resolution is sufficient, bleed has been added where required, and so on. Another recommended way to catch any errors is to get your commercial printer to supply a printed proof, which you should also carefully scrutinise for errors and technical issues before sanctioning the full print run.

11: Not Embedding or Outlining Fonts

Forgetting to either embed or outline (vectorise) fonts within your final artwork file can lead to unexpected font substitutions that could wreck the look of your final printed piece.

Solution: Save a version of your InDesign artwork file first with it’s ‘live’ (editable) text. Then select all text with the pointer tool and convert it to vectors (using the Create Outlines command under the Type menu) and re-save it with a new name. The reason for keeping two versions is in case you subsequently spot an error and need to go back to the original file version to correct the document. You can’t do that with outlined fonts as they’ve become vectors (shapes) rather than live letters, even though they look identical. One final tip is to then use the Type > Find Font command to ensure that you haven’t missed any fonts and that there are no live ones left. Then, once all other checks have been made and there are no longer any live fonts in the document, save your print-ready PDF.

Another option is to embed all fonts rather than outlining them. However, outlining them in the way described above is more reliable, particularly as some font licences occasionally stop you from being able to embed them.

Let us Produce Your Design & Artwork

Southside Print, printers in London Bridge & Borough, SE1One sure-fire way to avoid all the potential problems above is to let us do your design and artwork for you. It’ll save you many hours of work, if not days, and will look totally professional. In tandem with digital printing, large format printing, and eco-friendly printing, it’s what we do professionally, after all. We have our own in-house designers and finished artists, who know graphic design and printing services backwards, so it’s really no trouble. We’re competitively priced and printing quotations are free. So, if you are looking for professional, high quality design, artwork or printing in London Bridge and Borough in South East London (SE1), please get in touch here , ask for a free printing or design quotation here, or call 020 7378 6754. We’ll be happy to help.

Why Careful Colour Consideration is Crucial for Design

Crucial colour considerations for design

When it comes to design, the choice of colour is incredibly important. A colour palette alone can make the difference between a design being attractive — or totally repellent. Even if the underlying styling and layout of any design is superb, its ultimate success can live or die on the colours used. That’s the same whether you’re talking about graphic design for sales and marketing literature, interior design, product design, or any other kind of design. However, the impact of colour goes way deeper than aesthetics, as we’ll see.

Selecting the best colour palette for your graphics

As with design itself, colour is a very subjective thing, so it’s always going to be impossible to please everyone. It’s important to try, though, because the colour palette you use in your design will have a striking affect on how well your sales or marketing piece is received by your target audience. For this reason, it’s well worth spending extra time on carefully considering your colour palette, well before your piece is published or printed. Some market research is also well worth doing, whether that’s full market research with the public or obtaining a rough gauge from others in your office and/or family. Editor’s note: as a qualified designer myself, my choice regarding some colours for printed graphics is still swayed by such feedback, even decades after it was first given.

Colour can literally change the viewer’s mood.

Feel & mood

Feel and mood are, by far, the most overriding sensations instilled in the viewer through the use of colour. Colour deeply affects the whole perception of your printed piece — it can lift the spirit, or repel it. It can catch the eye in a good way when you get it right, or a bad way when you don’t. Colours can excite the onlooker, or relax them. Colour can often literally change the viewer’s mood. When it comes to colour as a communication tool, it can shout your marketing messages or whisper them subconsciously. Colour can associate your product or service with quality if you want it to. It can help to incite a feeling of urgency, or get the audience to experience any number of other feelings. When you think about it, that’s an incredibly powerful tool for designers and marketers.

Colour is an incredibly powerful tool for designers and marketers.

Choosing your colour palette

Choosing your colour paletteA single design and layout can be used in different ways, with different effects, depending on which set of colour combinations are used in the overall colour palette. Graphic designers call those colour palettes ‘colourways’ and there are a few different ways that they can be chosen. As a designer myself, my favourite tips for choosing colourways are:

  • Find a photograph that you like in terms of colours, then sample those colours using the eye-dropper tool in Photoshop or similar (read on for free way to do this online if you don’t have Photoshop). It works very well when any photos in the printed piece share the same colours as surrounding graphics, ensuring that the entire marketing piece is colour-coordinated and attractive.
  • Another great tool for choosing colourway palettes is to look at the colour swatches on ColourLovers.com. The site shows thousands of different colour palettes that have been uploaded by the community over several years. It ranks colour palettes by popularity or by the number of times they have been saved as ‘favourites’ as well as having colour sections for different sectors (branding, websites, interiors etc). It also shows which colourways are trending at any given time. There are some useful tools there, for generating colour palettes and indeed the lavender colourway graphic in the main image above was generated by such a tool on the site.
  • Another, more obvious, way to choose a good colour palette for your design is to simply keep your eyes open, so you can spot, note or save good existing examples from others. This could mean keeping brochures and booklets that you have liked the colours, look and feel of, or bookmarking websites that have nice colourways etc. Most good designers will do this as a matter of course.
  • Pinterest is also a great tool for saving colourway examples, or finding them, and saving them into well-organised segmented areas.
  • One of the most widely used tools for the professional graphic designer is the tried-and-tested Pantone colour swatch book. There are various types available, including ‘spot colour’ swatches, ‘process’ printing colours (a.k.a. ‘CMYK’), pastels, metallics and lots more. Just like with paint charts for home DIY, they allow you to pick out colours and to compare them to each other side by side. Crucially, though, in the case of Pantone swatches, they allow you to specify the final choice of colours in your artwork in such a way that they will reproduce reliably i.e. exactly as envisaged on your final printed piece.
  • Designers should also consider colour psychology and what colour means to certain cultures when appropriate. For example, in China, blue symbolises immortality whereas in other countries it can represent the colour of mourning. So, care needs to be taken.

Check your artwork’s colour mode before you go to print

It should be noted that colours destined to be used for printing will need to be in ‘CMYK’ mode if printing digitally. For litho printing it can be CMYK mode or ‘spot’ colour, as appropriate. Avoid ‘RGB’ colour mode completely if you are going to have your sales or marketing piece commercially printed. See our Printing & Artwork Tips for further information or leave it all to us. Simply ask for a graphic design and/or artwork quotation — they’re free and without pressure or obligation, so there’s nothing to lose. As well as choosing attractive and appropriate colours and generating a great design for your printed job, we would be very happy to print it for you, of course.

We are Southside Print, a digital printer based in London SE1, close to Borough tube and London Bridge station. Call 020 7378 6754 or contact us here and we’ll be very happy to help you with your next printed project.

Order Your Printed Christmas Cards!

Overprinted personal & corporate Christmas cards

With Christmas just around the corner, it’s time to order your overprinted Christmas cards — while there’s still time. Add your personalised greeting, company logo and, if you like, even a printed signature to save you having to sign each card individually. Order quickly, though — there’s not much time!

Whether they’re for you personally or for your company or organisation, Southside Print London Bridge has a great range of options to choose from.

Off-the-shelf Christmas cards

We have something to suit everyone in our off-the-shelf range. Choose a card from one of the following categories and we’ll overprint it for you (minimum quantity 25):

'Robin in the snow' Christmas cardOur ‘Animals & birds’ category includes images of Highland cattle in the snow, playful robins, reindeer, owls and tigers to name just a few. See more.

'Winter village' Christmas cardOur ‘Christmas themed’ cards include a wide variety of illustrated options showing anything from winter scenes and sparkling reindeer to jolly Santas, penguins and decorated Christmas trees. See more.

'The Adoration of the Kings' Christmas cardOur ‘Fine Art & Religious’ category offers more traditional cards depicting scenes like the Nativity, the Star over Bethlehem, skating children and musical angels. See more.

'International landmarks' Christmas cardOur ‘International’ category shows Christmas cards with ‘world globe’ baubles, colourful international landmarks, Christmas trees made from world flags and the Tree of Peace, complete with white doves. See more.

'Shopping in the city' Christmas cardOur ‘London Scenes’ card category features beautiful illustrations of London, depicting things like skating at Somerset House, Tower Bridge across the River Thames, Trafalgar Square at Christmas, the London Eye and several other London scenes in the snow. See more.

'Castle Kilchurn on Loch Awe' Christmas cardOur ‘Photography’ range of Christmas cards includes photos of frozen berries, snow 'Tree of light' Christmas cardscenes and various photographs of nature during the winter. See more.

Our ‘Trees’ category features a wide selection of Christmas tree cards, each tree depicted in a different illustrative style. Some are bright and modern, others are dark and rich … and everything in between. See more.

Click the button, right, to view the full range. (Return here to order).

If you’d like to order some cards please make a note of your preferred card’s reference number (the ‘SKU’) and then fill in the order form here. We will, of course, confirm and agree pricing with you before proceeding. All cards come complete with a high quality white envelope (peel & seal, 110gsm weight). The minimum order is 25 cards. Orders usually take about ten days from approval of your proof.

Bespoke Christmas cards

If you prefer something totally unique, then we can print bespoke Christmas cards for you. You can either Read more

Printing for Options Consultancy Services in London E1W

Litho, digital and large format printing for Options Consultancy, London

Southside Print London Bridge has recently produced a whole range of different printing for Options Consultancy Services Ltd in St Katharine’s Way, E1W. That’s in the St Katharine Docks area, close to both Tower Bridge and The Tower of London.

Roller banner produced for Options Consultancy, LondonThe Printing

Recent printing includes:

  • A double-sided full colour A6 postcard.
  • A tall roller banner (size: W850mm x H2m) printed in full colour and produced within a week.
  • 100 copies of each of ten different A4 leaflets, printed double-sided onto 170gsm Essential Silk stock. These were produced on SRA2 as multiples (‘ganged up’) then cut down to A4 so as to save money on production.
  • A2 full colour printed posters (4 kinds, all landscape format), printed with a very quick turnaround onto 190gsm Photo Satin stock.

Printing of postcards for Options, London

Design and artwork was supplied by the client and the printing represents a good mixture between digital, litho and large format printing processes, as appropriate for each individual piece.

About Options

Options is an International Development organisation whose aim is to transform the health of women and children, primarily across Africa and Asia as well as in the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean. Their work, in over 50 countries to date, focuses on three key goals: Read more

Printing a Board Game for The Hepatitis C Trust, SE1

Printed board game and cards for The Hepatitis C Trust

Southside Print London Bridge has recently printed an innovative and visually striking educational tool for The Hepatitis C Trust, a registered charity located just up the road at Crosby Row, London SE1. The educational tool comes in the form of a board game, 50cm square, which is printed in full colour in a style similar to Monopoly or Snakes & Ladders. Along with the board itself comes a set of players’ cards that are used to affect progress and outcomes during the ‘game’. However, The Buddy Game is actually way more than a game. Part of a National project, it’s an educational tool that helps to train volunteers to help those who have come into contact with Hepatitis C, in the best possible way. Click the images to see the cards and board in more detail.

The Printing

Printed board game and cards for The Hepatitis C TrustThe board game was printed, using our large format printing facilities, on 190gsm photo paper. It was then gloss laminated. Design and artwork were supplied by the customer and 10 boards were produced for them.

The cards, which are part of the game, were also produced from the customer’s artwork files. They were digitally printed in full colour, both sides, onto 350gsm silk stock, which was then matt laminated to both sides. In total, each of the ten board games was supplied with 10 sets of 6 different cards, making a total of 600 printed cards provided by Southside Print London Bridge.

About The Hepatitis C Trust

The Hepatitis C Trust is a UK charity with offices in both London and Edinburgh. It is run by patients and ex-patients to help those who have been exposed to the disease. The charity’s primary mission is to help eradicate the disease completely and, with better treatments and new drug developments becoming available, this is now a real possibility — the disease could be eradicated perhaps by 2030 or even earlier. Along the way, the Trust also aims to end the discrimination often experienced by sufferers who are too often assumed to have contracted the disease through drug or substance abuse. The reality is that Read more

Printed NCR Sets, Menus & Posters for Nelson’s Restaurant, SE1

Design and printing for Nelson's Restaurant

One of our favourite places to eat in Borough High Street is Nelson’s Sandwich Bar & Restaurant. Their food is delicious, freshly cooked and very affordable, but more about that in a moment.  First, we’ll tell you a little about the kind of design and print work we’ve been doing for them recently:

  • Our very own graphic designer Matt Potter designed and supplied artwork, to the customer’s brief, for their brand new menus. These were digitally printed/colour duplicated onto 200gsm white ‘Mondi’ stock. We printed them in full colour both sides onto SRA3 (oversize A3) card, trimmed them down to A3, gloss encapsulated them and then folded them to A4. The reason for the encapsulation, which both laminates the menus and seals the edges, is so that they are waterproof and are easily cleaned after use in the restaurant. We supplied just 28 menus, hence digitally printing them rather than using our litho presses.
  • Matt also designed, printed and supplied two A3 laminated signs/posters which are attractive and eye-catching for use in the restaurant. What better way to announce a special deal to customers!
  • 3-part NCR order padA very practical piece of print was a batch of 3-part NCR sets (pads) which are now being used by waiters and waitresses when taking orders. The restaurant required 100 pads, consisting of fifty 3-part NCR sets per pad. ‘NCR’ stands for No Carbon (as in carbon paper) Required. An NCR set is a multi-part pad, where a person can write on the top copy and, due to clever properties in the paper itself, the pressure of writing duplicates what’s being written onto subsequent sheets, so that different people can all have a copy. In this particular case, each of the 3-part sets has a printed white sheet at the top, followed by a blue and a yellow sheet underneath. So, for example, the waiter or waitress can keep a blue copy, the customer can have the top, white copy and the kitchen staff can have the 3rd, yellow copy. It’s quick and easy, particularly as we ‘micro perf’ (perforate) the pads so that pages can be torn off easily and also because we design the wrap-around cover so that it doubles up as protection under each 3-part set being written upon. That way the next set of 3 sheets doesn’t also duplicate the order. Each order pad also has a board back, to keep it rigid when being used.

About Nelson’s Restaurant

Nelson's Restaurant, Borough High Street, London SE1Nelson’s Restaurant is literally a stone’s throw from Borough High Street tube and a just a few minutes’ walk from London Bridge station in London’s SE1. They offer breakfast, lunch and takeaways during weekdays from 7am to 5pm. Southside Print London Bridge can definitely vouch for how delicious their food is! They do a huge range of different teas, coffees and cold drinks along with a fantastic choice of tasty breakfasts – all at extremely reasonable prices. For example, a large breakfast tea is just £1.50 and a Full English Breakfast is just £6.50.

You can also go for something like a vegetarian ciabatta or focaccia (a Tricolore of mozzarella, avocado and tomato is just £4.90, for example). Yum!

The lunch menu includes anything from fried scampi and calamari, to soup, various fresh pasta dishes and salads, which include Nelson’s own take on a Caesar Salad; a salad of crispy leaves layered with capers, croutons, grilled chicken and parmesan dressing (£7.90).

The takeaway menu includes Read more

Brochure Printing for Munro & Forster Communications, London SE1

Brochure printing for Munro Forster CommunicationsSouthside Print London Bridge recently printed some lovely brochures for Munro & Forster Communications, who are based a stone’s throw away from the SE1 printer at Bank Chambers, Borough High Street, just 5 minutes from London Bridge station.

The Contemporary Graphics

Both brochures use smart, modern designs that utilise contemporary ‘flat’ graphics and bright colours. As such, they’re easy on the eye, fresh looking and thoroughly engaging, which is a testament to the skill of the graphic designer, considering the subject matter involved.

The Digital Printing

The brochures were each printed in full colour process (‘CMYK’) from design and artwork supplied by the client’s own in-house graphic designer. Southside Print London Bridge utilised its digital presses to print both jobs as these best suited the relatively low quantities involved — just 100 and 300 were required respectively. Both brochures were printed with 200gsm cover stock and 120gsm internal sheets, which were all then trimmed, collated, folded and saddle-stitched into the finished brochure format. Printing production was turned around in just 2 days from start to finish.

About Munro & Forster Communications

Munro & Forster Communications is an award-winning consultancy that specialises in PR for sectors including healthcare, wellbeing, education and the environment. Clients, who range from food and pharmaceutical organisations to non-profits and the public sector, benefit from an integrated public relations and public affairs service through the use of both off-line and on-line PR activity, along with social media solutions where appropriate. As well as day-to-day media relations, services include Read more

Printing for The Art Academy, Borough, London SE1

Digital printing for The Art Academy

Spring Courses PosterThe Art Academy is one of our close neighbours here in the London Bridge/Borough region of London. They sometimes need posters, brochures and flyers printed and, as we’re in the same SE1 area, we are a natural choice for printing of such items. A couple of examples of marketing collateral produced for them can be seen above and details of both the printing and the Academy follow below.

Open Days PosterWe produced the Spring Courses poster (shown right) using The Art Academy’s own design and artwork supplied and printed it as ten A3 posters and fifty A5 flyers. Both were printed in full colour, single-sided, using our digital printing press. This was perfect for the relatively low volumes required and allowed for a speedy turnaround. The stock used was 170gsm ‘Essential Silk’ which started life at a size of SRA2.

We also produced a similar poster, in the same manner, for their Fine Art Foundation open days. This can be seen on the left and utilised exactly the same ‘Essential Silk’ paper as the first example.

Lastly, we also supplied some full colour, 200gsm brochures (not shown), each incorporating a front flap. Due to the low volume and fast turnaround needed those were produced via colour copy/duplication and finished to a folded size of A5.

Special Offer to students of The Art AcademySpecial Printing Offer for Art Academy Students

Southside Print London Bridge are currently doing some great printing deals for Art Academy students, who are being offered a 20% discount on business cards, A5 flyers and A6 flyers. These would be great for impressing future clients and employers at Graduate Shows. Click the blue poster thumbnail for more details and special pricing or download the full-sized version here (right-click to save).

About The Art Academy

The Art Academy, based just around the corner in Borough High Street, is an independent art school and registered charity (No. 1078804). It offers art education programmes via evening classes, part-time classes, short courses and weekend courses right through to longer-term Diplomas, Foundation and Certificate courses. The wide range of art programmes is matched only by the huge diversity of those attending and includes portrait, figure and sculpture work, painting, printmaking, ceramics, glass, digital art, art history and drawing.

“In just 10 years, The Art Academy has grown from one person’s idea into a thriving organisation, that nurtures creative talent and reaches out to the wider community.”

The principle aims of The Art Academy are: Read more

Duplication, Digital & Large Format Printing for ‘Teens and Toddlers’, London Bridge

Printing for Teens and ToddlersThe London Bridge branch of Southside Print recently produced printing and duplication work for Teens and Toddlers, which is based in Tooley Street near London Bridge SE1.

Digital and large format printing

A1 large format display board

The work produced for Teens & Toddlers included:

  • A 4-page brochure (shown above) which was produced as A3 full colour print-outs that were then creased and folded down to A4. This particular job used 350gsm ‘Essential Gloss’ stock and the design and artwork were supplied by the client;
  • An A1 display panel (shown above right) which was printed on our large format printing press and produced using a 190gsm full colour print mounted to foam board. Again, the design and artwork were supplied by the customer.

Southside Print London Bridge produced both jobs entirely in-house using our digital printing/copying service and large format printing facilities. Click the links to learn more about those printing services.

About Teens and Toddlers

Teens and Toddlers is an award-winning organisation that exists to support young people, particularly the disadvantaged and those who have abandoned hope of achieving well at school. What makes the organisation out of the ordinary is that teenagers mentor younger children, the aim being to build life skills, self-belief and confidence in the teenager, thereby enhancing success at school and ultimately within both the workplace and community. The toddlers involved benefit enormously too. Mentoring of younger children by teenagers was shown to Read more

Business Cards for The Electoral Reform Society

Printed business cards for the Electoral Reform Society

Southside Print London Bridge recently re-printed business cards for The Electoral Reform Society which is based in the same SE1 London area and is a leading proponent for democratic reform in the UK. The business cards were printed in ‘full colour process’ (also known as ‘CMYK’) and were double-sided using a design and layout supplied by our very own Matt Potter here in the London Bridge branch of Southside Print. The cards used a 450gsm silk coated stock which, after printing, was finished with a matt lamination. This protects the cards as well as giving them a contemporary look and a soft, silky feel.

About the Society

The Society stands firm in their belief that “Politics can be better than it is” and campaigns for a better democracy.

“Our vision is a representative democracy fit for the 21st Century.”

Just a few of the specific issues that the Society aims to improve include:

  • the fact that the House of Lords remains totally unelected, flying in the face of a so-called democracy;
  • reducing the ‘gender gap’ by increasing the low number of women in politics;
  • reducing big money’s influence on politics;
  • making votes match the make-up of seats in Parliament more fairly;
  • making sure that those in power can be held to account by voters;
  • ensuring that every voter can help shape the decisions that will affect their lives.

Founded in 1884, The Electoral Reform Society was then known as the Proportional Representation Society. Its founder was the Victorian naturalist and archaeologist called Sir John Lubbock and its aim was to gather like-minded people together to fight for a fairer vote.  The Society quickly grew in numbers and included C.P. Scott, the editor of what’s now called The Guardian, The Reverend Charles Dodgson, who we all know better as ‘Lewis Carroll’, and Thomas Hare who brought about the Single Transferable Vote.

“Politics is too important to be left to the politicians”

Now based in London SE1, the Society is Read more