Common Artwork Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

Common Artwork Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

At Southside Print we can either accept artwork files from customers, or produce artwork for them. Obviously, clients can save some money if they choose the former option and do their own design and artwork. However, if they’re not used to generating their own professional-grade artwork, common mistakes are easy to miss. These could lead to digital artwork files not working at all, unexpected printing results or, even worse, paid-for printing being totally unusable. For these reasons, we thought we’d highlight the most common artwork mistakes that we see, in the hope that they can be avoided by customers who supply their own artwork files to us.

1: Incorrect Colour Mode

Colour photos and graphics should be saved in CMYK mode not RGB.Most mobile phones and digital cameras save images in RGB mode. This mode is meant for screen viewing rather than commercial printing. If digital artwork is supplied with images in RGB mode, there’s a significant chance that they will not look as expected – potentially terrible – on the final printed results.

Solution: Before putting full colour images into artwork files, they should first be opened in an application like Photoshop and re-saved in CMYK mode. For the same reason, the final artwork file (usually saved as a print-ready PDF) should also be saved in CMYK mode when printing full colour images.

2: Inadequate Image Resolution

Have you ever looked at something printed, perhaps in a brochure, and spotted one or more images that look a bit fuzzy or, worse still, pixelated? Both are almost certain to be due to the images having inadequate resolution within the artwork files supplied. With resolution too low, images can appear ‘soft’ and lacking detail at best, or broken up into visible squares (the pixels) at worst.

Solution: Ensure that photographic images are at least 300 dots per inch (‘dpi’, also known as ‘pixels per inch’ or ‘ppi’) at the size they are going to be shown in the final printing. This can also be checked in professional image editing applications like Photoshop. It’s important to ensure that the final digital artwork file (again, usually provided as a print-ready PDF) is also saved with images set to 300dpi or, for particularly fine screen rulings, 350dpi minimum. If they’re well above that resolution, most applications can save the print-ready PDF in such a way that images with resolutions above, say, 450dpi are ‘downsampled’ to 300 or 350dpi. If downsampling is used, the Image Quality setting should be set to Maximum.

Related note: ‘Line artwork’ type images should either be saved as vectors (e.g. Illustrator ‘EPS’ format) or, if they’re ‘rasterised’ (pixel-based) images, save them at a minimum of 1200dpi to avoid jagged edges showing on areas like curves.

3: Using the Wrong Application for Professional Artwork

Applications like Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and even Corel Draw are fine for office use and for outputting to standard desktop printers. However, they’re not really seen as professional applications for use within the commercial printing industry. Attempting to use them as such may well simply not work, give unprofessional, substandard results, cause glitches in the case of Corel Draw, or require your commercial printer to re-make your artwork again from scratch (at significant cost in all likelihood).

Solution: Don’t attempt to use desktop applications like Word and PowerPoint nor, in our view, Corel Draw for use with high-end commercial printing. Instead, you should be using a professionally-recognised design and artwork application like Adobe InDesign. It is the de-facto design, page make-up and artwork application used in the design and print industry, having pretty much replaced older applications like Quark Express and PageMaker. It is usually used in tandem with images and graphics brought in from Adobe Photoshop and/or Adobe Illustrator, which are also both the de-facto professional applications for each of their respective fields.

4: Missing Out Bleed

Add 3mm bleed to elements extending to the paper's edgeIf your design and artwork has colours or images going right to the edge of the printed item, you shouldn’t just stop your artwork there because guillotining of the final printing is not usually accurate to tenths of a millimetre. Therefore, you could end up with white edges showing rather than your background colour or image going right up to and off the edge of the cut sheet.

Solution: Remember to add an extra 3mm of ‘bleed’ (an area that prints further than the edge of the sheet) to all artwork elements that you want to print to the edge. That way, if guillotining is not quite accurate, your colour or image will still print to the edge because you built in a 3mm margin of possible error.

5: Sitting Artwork in the Middle of a Larger Sheet

When producing finished artwork for, say, a business card, it might be tempting to produce it in the middle of an A4 sheet, because that’s the size of paper you might usually deal with on your computer. However, saving smaller artworks on larger paper sizes within digital artwork can end up costing you money and causing problems at printing stage. That’s because it’s terribly difficult, if not impossible, to get rid of the surrounding margin. That’s important when we want to use several duplicates of the business card on the uncut printing sheets, so as to get economies of scale and reduce paper/card waste.

Solution: Within your design and artwork application, ensure that your document size is set to the correct, final size that you want your printed piece to be, and no larger (apart from the additional 3mm of bleed if needed — see above). Also discuss whether you need to add ‘trim marks’ with your commercial printer as that requirement can vary from printer to printer.

6: Supplying Readers’ Spreads instead of Printers’ Spreads

Let’s take the example of an 8-page brochure for illustrative purposes. In that example, although page 2 will be next to page 3 from a reader’s point of view on the final brochure, that’s not how they’re actually printed. If you supply your artwork with double-page spreads set up in that way, pages will end up on the wrong order in the final printing.

Solution: In the 8-page brochure example, you have two choices. The first is to supply individual pages rather than spreads and then allow your printer to do what’s called ‘imposing’ them into the correct multi-page spreads from which to print. That’s the safest option if you’re not a professional designer or ‘finished artist’. For professionals, though, you can supply properly imposed ‘printer’s spreads’, for example with the front cover on the right next to the back cover on the left, page 2 printed opposite page 7, page 3 alongside page 5 and so on. Either way, once printed, trimmed and folded, the pages will end up in the correct order, so long as the imposing is done thoughtfully.

7: Using the Space Bar for Tabulated or Indented Content

If you hit the space bar multiple times to try to align indented content or columns of text or numbers, you will almost certainly end up with columns that don’t quite line up vertically in a straight line. That’s because most commercially printed fonts don’t use a ‘fixed width’ measurement for every character. So, one line of 30 characters (including spaces) will almost certainly end up a different length to another line of 30 different characters. Hence, columns will look misaligned and unprofessional.

Solution: Professional designers use properly set-up tabs to align their tabulated content, not the space bar. This ensures that tabulated content and indents line up perfectly. And what’s more, it’s easier than you think once you’ve tried it a few times — and saves time.

8: Ad-hoc Text Styles

Changing font styles, colours, sizes and weights on an ad-hoc basis as you work through your text content is more likely to end up with styling errors and inconsistencies. This can make a printed piece look amateurish.

Solution: Use your professional design and artwork package’s character and paragraph style palettes properly, i.e. pre-set a range of styles that you are likely to use and then apply one style to each title, sub-title, paragraph etc. as you work through your document. It’ll save you time and mean that styling is totally consistent throughout your final printed piece. What’s more, if you decide one particular type of content needs to be altered throughout the entire document, all you need to do is to change that particular pre-set style once in the palette — and the whole document will update itself.

9: Using Clip-Art

Clip-art from desktop applications is all very well for internally-produced ‘office’ type documents that are to be printed on desk-top printers. However, they often lead to unexpected printing results on commercial printers. That’s because clip-art formats like Windows Meta Files are not designed for such commercial use; they often cause glitches in the printing or crashes in commercial printing PostScript software. In essence, clip-art is simply not fit for commercial printing purposes.

Solution: There are 3 possible solutions. Firstly, you could avoid clip-art unless it’s professionally produced specifically for high-end commercial PostScript printing and comes in a file format like .ai or .eps (and is in CMYK mode). Secondly, you could consider generating the designed graphic yourself using a professional programme like Adobe Illustrator. Then export it to your InDesign document layout as an EPS file. Lastly, you could try to ‘rasterise’ any suitable image (for example, by opening it, or a PDF of it, in Photoshop) so that it essentially ends up as the equivalent of a photo, i.e. made up of pixels instead of clip-art vectors. N.B. don’t forget to check it’s in CMYK mode and at least 300dpi if going for a rasterised (non-vector) route.

10: Not Proof-Reading Thoroughly

Once printed, it’s too late to correct any errors that were missed in your design and artwork. And you’ll still have to pay for the original printing and any reprint needed.

Solution:It goes almost without saying that you should check, double-check and triple-check every job before sending it to your commercial printer. Maybe even get another person to check again for you. Spell checking and proof-reading are all part of the checking process, as are technical checks to ensure that images are in the correct mode, that resolution is sufficient, bleed has been added where required, and so on. Another recommended way to catch any errors is to get your commercial printer to supply a printed proof, which you should also carefully scrutinise for errors and technical issues before sanctioning the full print run.

11: Not Embedding or Outlining Fonts

Forgetting to either embed or outline (vectorise) fonts within your final artwork file can lead to unexpected font substitutions that could wreck the look of your final printed piece.

Solution: Save a version of your InDesign artwork file first with it’s ‘live’ (editable) text. Then select all text with the pointer tool and convert it to vectors (using the Create Outlines command under the Type menu) and re-save it with a new name. The reason for keeping two versions is in case you subsequently spot an error and need to go back to the original file version to correct the document. You can’t do that with outlined fonts as they’ve become vectors (shapes) rather than live letters, even though they look identical. One final tip is to then use the Type > Find Font command to ensure that you haven’t missed any fonts and that there are no live ones left. Then, once all other checks have been made and there are no longer any live fonts in the document, save your print-ready PDF.

Another option is to embed all fonts rather than outlining them. However, outlining them in the way described above is more reliable, particularly as some font licences occasionally stop you from being able to embed them.

Let us Produce Your Design & Artwork

Southside Print, printers in London Bridge & Borough, SE1One sure-fire way to avoid all the potential problems above is to let us do your design and artwork for you. It’ll save you many hours of work, if not days, and will look totally professional. In tandem with digital printing, large format printing, and eco-friendly printing, it’s what we do professionally, after all. We have our own in-house designers and finished artists, who know graphic design and printing services backwards, so it’s really no trouble. We’re competitively priced and printing quotations are free. So, if you are looking for professional, high quality design, artwork or printing in London Bridge and Borough in South East London (SE1), please get in touch here , ask for a free printing or design quotation here, or call 020 7378 6754. We’ll be happy to help.

Packaging Printers & Designers

Packaging printers & designers in London SE1

Printing and production of packaging in London SE1We’re sometimes asked if we design and print packaging. The simple answer is ‘yes’ because, to us, it’s just another natural use of our in-house design and printing capabilities. Southside Print can handle pretty much any type of printing imaginable and packaging is no exception. So, you are not limited to just the standard kind of thing, like brochures, stationery and flyers. We regularly produce high quality printing for packaging items too. These include anything from cartons and swing tickets to bags. The list of possibilities is almost endless, a few examples being:

  • Printed labels and stickers including wine labels, special offer stickers, pricing labels etc.;
  • Cartons for products;
  • Boxes of various kinds;
  • Printed bags;
  • Printed cardboard sleeves, e.g. to wrap around boxed products;
  • Header cards for retail products including ‘Euro’ slots if required;
  • Swing tickets;
  • ‘Pillow’ packs;
  • Packaging ‘inners’ and backing cards e.g. for products in clam packs, blister packs and cello packs;
  • Point of sale (‘POS’) or Point of Purchase (‘POP’) card dispensers;

Printed literature for packaged products

We also routinely produce the kind of printed literature that you find inside product packaging. This includes instruction manuals, assembly instruction sheets, information pamphlets, warranty documents, guarantee registration cards, vouchers for cross-selling, catalogues, price lists, order forms and so on. If it involves printing on paper, card or board, we can print it!

Advanced print finishing techniques to make your packaging stand out

As well as our digital printing facilities, we also have a whole range of in-house ‘print finishing’ options to make your printed packaging really stand out. Options include lamination (matt, gloss etc.), encapsulation, gloss U.V. varnish including spot varnishing, die-cutting to give your packaging non-standard shapes, traditional hot foil stamping and digital foiling. We can also perforate, score, crease, fold, collate, drill holes, add eyelets, ribbons, add and affix glue tabs, and so on. So, please remember that we’re a print finisher as well as being a printer. Read more

Why Choose Southside Print?

Why choose Southside Print

With so many printers available in the SE1 region of South London, it can be confusing knowing which one to use for your printing. So why choose Southside Print? Here we’ll tell you just a few of the many reasons why Southside Print would make an excellent choice:

We are highly experienced

Our staff have been in the print industry for many years. We are all from different parts of the print and design industry and together offer a fully comprehensive design and printing service — a one-stop print and design shop, in fact.

We have an excellent reputation

We are highly thought of, with excellent customer reviews and testimonials. Check out Southside Print’s Google reviews if you’d like to see independent proof.

We have in-house design as well as printing

We have an in-house graphic design team who can take your concept and make it look amazing! So, your finished print will ‘sell’ your product or service to your audience in the best possible way.

We use only high-end equipment

We have the very best high-end printing equipment available including digital printing that offers exceptional quality. We have lamination services, and in-house digital foiling, as well as the option of traditional foiling for those who require it. All our finishing facilities are in-house, meaning we can complete virtually every printing order entirely under one roof, unlike many printers. This means we can control quality, pricing and production speed from start to completion. So, we get the job done without the delays associated with having to sub-contract certain processes — that’s simply not possible with the vast majority of other printers in London.

We have a ‘can do’ attitude

We do our very best to accommodate as many customers’ needs as we possibly can. If we can do it, we will, even if it’s not usually a standard process or service. We are here to help you and we want you to come back! So, we are very happy to help by going that extra mile … Read more

The Benefits of Using a Print Management Service

The benefits of using a print management company

Southside Print is a print management company as well as being a one-stop design and print shop. But what exactly is ‘print management’ and how can it benefit your company or organisation?

Print Management Services

Print management companies take on all the technical and practical responsibilities of looking after the supply of your sales and marketing literature. That might be anything from company stationery, letterheads and business cards to brochures, catalogues, flyers, leaflets, exhibition displays and potentially much more. In essence, a good print management company will look after the production and supply of potentially every piece of your sales and marketing collateral. That leaves you free to get on with running your business and can also have some cost benefits.

Design, Artwork & Printing

Print management isn’t only about the supply of printing. As print managers, we often handle all the design and artwork requirements for customers too. On a simple level that might be preparing artwork for something as basic as the business cards for new members of staff. On a more complex level it might include updating catalogue products, prices and artwork or supplying a brand new corporate identity, then updating every piece of sales collateral to reflect that new I.D.

Keeping on Top of Print Stocks

Day to day print management, however, usually consists of us making sure our customers have enough brochures, leaflets, stationery and suchlike available every single day. We’ll touch base regularly to check whether customers will soon be running low and make doubly sure that we have a replenishment supply ready whenever it’s going to be needed.

Saving You Money

Perhaps surprisingly, a good print management company can actually save you money, despite doing so much more for you. Because all printing is handled under one roof, we can build in the economies of scale. For example, we can Read more

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year

The staff at Southside Print would like to wish everyone a wonderful Christmas and the very best for the New Year when it finally arrives. Our thanks go to all those who used our design, artwork, printing and print management services during the course of 2018 — all the work has kept us very busy indeed. So, a very big Thank You to one and all!

Christmas & New Year opening times for Southside Print, London SE1Christmas & New Year Opening Times

We close for the Christmas break on Friday 21st December at 3pm, re-opening on Wednesday 2nd January 2019 at 9am. So, if you have anything urgent before we take a break, there is no time to lose and you’ll need to get your orders to us as soon as possible should you need work turned around before Christmas.

Our Online Shop Will be Available 24/7

During our break you can also, of course, order printing online for a whole range of products including business cards, stationery (including letterheads & compliments slips), leaflets, brochures and posters. Click the bold links to take a look at all the options along with our very competitive pricing.

In the mean time, please continue to send through any requests for quotations and we’ll attend to those as soon possible, so that you can hit the ground running when the New Year arrives. You can also call 020 7378 6754 to speak with us during opening hours.

Thanks again and every good wish to you for Christmas, the New Year and beyond.

The Southside Print Team, Tabard Street, London SE1.

The Value of Great Graphic Design

The value of great graphic design

Never underestimate the power of graphic design. It has the power to either make or break your sales and marketing efforts. Too many people dismiss design as an unnecessary expense but, in reality, it is incredibly important to your bottom line. As such, it deserves an adequate allowance of both time and budget otherwise you risk wasting both those precious commodities entirely. In this post, we’ll explain why skimping on your graphic design budget may represent a fool’s economy. Not convinced? Read on …

Think about it for a moment: what is the single most important thing that world-dominating companies like Apple have at their core? Answer: excellent design. Without that, their products would simply be buried in an ocean that’s littered with hundreds of mediocre products. Excellent design lifts them high above the competition and also makes their products desirable. And once converted, famously few Apple customers ever go back.

It’s the same for printed sales and marketing pieces, adverts and packaging. Looking mediocre is a sure fire way for your promotional efforts to be completely overlooked in the ‘din’ of other mediocre efforts that compete in your marketplace. Excellent design, in contrast, will both attract and entice your potential audience so they notice and desire your product or service, not those of your competitor. Yet so many companies miss this simple opportunity by seeing design as an unnecessary expense rather than the incredibly powerful marketing tool that it is!

Let’s break down the main components of graphic design …

Good Design = Good Communication

Graphic design is about much more than how your sales and marketing pieces look. Good graphic design primarily has great communication at its heart. It’s all very well if your leaflet, brochure, poster or packaging looks attractive, but that’s no good to anyone if they don’t understand, in an instant, what it’s all about and what is on offer. So, one of the first considerations of any good graphic designer is to identify what the core message is and then to communicate that message prominently to the prospective audience. A good graphic designer will also pick out any secondary and subsequent message elements, making sure that each is communicated with the appropriate weighting in the sales or marketing piece. Using this hierarchical approach to the prominence of elements and messages will mean that the prospective customer knows where to look first and thereby learn quickly what is being offered and why.

Good graphic design primarily has great communication at its heart.

Features & Benefits

Once the product or service being offered has been made clear, another job of a good graphic designer is to make sure that the features and benefits of the product or service are also clearly communicated to those taking a closer look. Features are no good alone, of course; the prospect needs to know how those features will benefit them — so don’t forget to include your product or service’s benefits in the printed text.

Looking Good

Then, of course, the printed communication needs to look eye-catching and attractive. The right graphical and typographical styles, photos and/or illustrations need to be presented in such a way that they catch the eye, communicate all the right messages as outlined above, all in a pleasing way. The ‘tone’ of the design also needs to be right. If your product or service is a luxury one, then the design and printed output needs to ooze quality. If your product or service is an inexpensive bargain, then the designer needs to pitch the design just right so that it looks high quality overall but does not look or feel too expensive. This fine balance is all part of the job of a good graphic designer.

Feeling Good

Part of that balance is, of course, the paper, card and print processes used in the final printing. Some printed items look better on textured papers and cards, others work better on uncoated stock and still others might look best on standard paper with, say, a matt lamination. There are many paper options and many finishing options to choose from, so good graphic designers will also be able to advise on what might work best for your particular product or service — and production budget. The optimum result will be a printed item that both looks and feels good, without breaking the bank.

It’s All a Waste without a CTA

Once all of the above has been considered, then you’re well on your way to ‘converting’ your prospect’s interest into an actual sale. However, there’s one more thing that needs to be included. Remember to Read more

Restored Artwork for Restorative Justice

Restored Artwork for Restorative Justice

Sometimes even a supposedly simple piece of design and artwork can meet with unforeseen complications, which can then make printing seemingly impossible. That’s exactly what happened with some business cards for our local client Why Me? recently, when their original artwork went completely missing. They’d had some fairly straight forward business cards produced in the past, but couldn’t locate the original artwork files. That’s where Southside Print’s Matt Potter came to the rescue. Matt is Southside Print’s resident graphic designer. He simply used some of the last few remaining cards as visual reference and, based on those, managed to rebuild the artwork entirely from scratch. He successfully matched fonts, colours, the layout and the design and, in no time at all, the ‘new’ business cards had been printed and supplied to the client — a great outcome for everyone.

Lost your Artwork? Need it Restored?

No problem at all. As with the business cards above, we can usually match fonts or find something very similar if an exact match is not possible. We can also match colours, design layouts and often we can even reproduce or substitute missing graphics. While some graphics are easier to replace than others, our talented design and artwork team can usually save the day and rescue the situation in virtually every case. That’s true whether it’s for business cards, leaflets, brochures or something larger like a poster or display panel. We can supply a free quotation before proceeding, of course, so you’ve nothing to lose by asking us for potential help.

About ‘Why Me?’

Why Me? is a national charity that primarily helps victims of crime to attain some kind of restorative justice. As part of this, the charity’s Restorative Justice Service helps offenders to understand the true impact of their crimes which, in turn, can often help to stop them re-offending in the future. Indeed, this is exactly how the charity started life …

The charity was started by Will Riley, himself a victim of crime. Back in 2002 when Will was a London businessman, a burglar gained entry to his house. Will confronted the burglar, a struggle ensued and Will eventually managed to hand the burglar over to the police. It turned out that the burglar was a career criminal named Peter Woolf. Woolf was sent to prison for the crime but the two men later met again voluntarily at a ‘Restorative Justice’ meeting at Pentonville Prison.

“Imagine the person who has caused you harm is sitting opposite… What would you say?”

Will, the victim, was able to explain the impact of the burglary directly to the offender in question and to obtain answers to some challenging questions. This process turned out to be a healing one and represented quite a turning point for both men. Will Riley subsequently felt that he was no longer fearful of opening his front door and Peter Woolf stopped offending completely, going ‘straight’ after many years of crime. Not only did both men directly benefit but also it meant that potentially hundreds of additional people did not become victims of the burglar once he left prison. Such is the power and potential of Restorative Justice.

The video below explains more and features both Will and Peter, who both now Read more

Printing for The Riverside Bookshop, Tooley Street, London SE1

Printing for the Riverside Bookshop, London SE1

Southside Print is very happy to count The Riverside Bookshop amongst its many loyal customers. For some time we have been printing their Little Red Card. It’s a small but effective piece of marketing and measures just 110mm x 85mm, so is about twice the size of a standard business card. To keep costs low for the client, we ‘gang up’ several copies, printing them together before trimming them down to their final size. We use SRA2 card (240gsm ‘Papago’ stock) during the early production stages. This card is just one small printing example amongst an amazing variety of items that we print for customers throughout the London Bridge/SE1 region and beyond.

The Little Red Card

The Little Red Card, printed by Southside Print, London Bridge, SE1The Little Red Card, as it’s officially known, is exactly that; a little red card. What is does for customers, though, is quite special as it saves them money at the bookshop. For every £10 a customer spends in store, they get an ink stamp inside the card. Once they have six stamps, they can present their card with their next purchase and it allows them to get £5 off their bill. So it’s simple, but ingenious! Ingenious not only for customers, of course; after all, it keeps customers coming back to the shop so could, alternatively, have been called a loyalty card. But we too prefer Little Red Card — it sounds so much more friendly, just like the staff in fact!

The Riverside Bookshop

The Riverside Bookshop, Tooley Street, London SE1The Riverside Bookshop is based in Tooley Street, London SE1 and has been selling books there for over 25 years. Along with literally thousands of books, they also sell National Book Tokens, greetings cards, gift wrap, notebooks and very occasionally a few toys. As well as stocking around 10,000 book titles in store, they can order in anything from a list of several hundred thousand additional books. Such special orders usually take just a couple of days to arrive and cost no extra. The bookshop also regularly stocks signed copies of books including many by major authors and household names — these would make very special gifts. Their website is well worth a look and is jam-packed full of fascinating information, reviews, book news and even has sections on Read more

Digital & Litho Printing for London Heating & Plumbing Company

Printing & artwork for The Little Red Heating Company, London

We believe this is the first time we’ve featured a heating and plumbing company on the blog, so welcome to our post all about The Little Red Heating Company. Here we’ll tell you all about them, but first we’ll discuss a few of the design, artwork and printing jobs that we’ve been doing for them in recent times. If you have any similar needs, do get in touch.

Printed NCR pads, labels, postcards & business cards

All design, layout and artwork is supplied by Southside Print London Bridge for this particular client. We supply simple, straight forward ‘business’ type printing for them including:

  • A4 invoice pads, which are printed on NCR (No Carbon Required) stock with white, pink and blue copies automatically being produced when the client writes on the top sheet. They are litho printed in 3 spot colours as well as being sequentially crash numbered then typically made into 4 pads of 50 invoice sets. NCR sets are a very convenient way of generating multi-copy invoices or orders the ‘traditional’ way (with a pen), particularly while out and about visiting customers;
  • business cards which have, until recently, been litho printed onto 400gsm “Extra White” uncoated stock using 3 spot colours. However, our digital printing machines are now so advanced that we may well swap over to digital printing for the business cards for future print runs, without any loss of quality;
  • postcards, which are litho printed litho onto 250gsm Silk card, in the same 3 spot colours. As with the business cards above, we will probably also swap to digitally printing these in future, for the same reason;
  • boiler labels, which represent a convenient reminder to home owners as well as being a great marketing tool for the company concerned. These are digitally printed on “Crack Back” label stock. As the name suggests, this type of label stock has linear cracks in the peel-off backing. These are present too allow the labels to simply be bent a little to expand the crack, thereby making removal of the backing sheet quick and easy.

About The Little Red Heating Company

The Little Red Heating Company, LondonThe Little Red Heating Company is London based and specialises in central heating and hot water system installation, maintenance and repair. Boiler repair or replacement, bathroom design/installation and general plumbing are all part of the service along with upgrades and replacements for pumps, thermostats, timers and valves. The company also supplies landlord certification and, of course, heating engineers are all Corgi registered.

The Little Red Heating Company also offers under floor heating, which is quick and inexpensive to install and provides both a fast method of heating rooms and a real feeling of luxury underfoot. That’s not the only benefit though; those with under floor heating will also experience a significant reduction in dust mites, so this particular heating method is also excellent for asthma sufferers.

Another great service from the company is the supply and installation of solar heating, through the use of solar panels, for the provision of domestic hot water. With temperatures in the UK gradually rising as they are, solar energy is now an extremely viable way to generate a cheap, sustainable energy source for homes. So, long-term savings can be made as well as helping the environment — a true win-win!

It’s refreshing to learn that Read more